A Huge Crowd Funded Machine Is About To Start Cleaning Up The Great Pacific Garbage Patch (Video) — April 24, 2018

In the Pacific ocean North East of Hawaii, exists a giant whirlpool of debris accumulated by the ocean currents, which is now scientifically referred to as the North Pacific Gyre. It’s one of the largest ecosystems on Earth, comprising millions of square kilometres. Today it’s better known as “The Great Garbage Patch,” an area the…Read more & short video – “Midway Island, North Pacific Ocean, Unbelievable!”

via A Huge Crowd Funded Machine Is About To Start Cleaning Up The Great Pacific Garbage Patch — Collective Evolution

(Video) This Woman Built A House From Milk Boxes — January 28, 2018

There is no doubt about it, humans have produced an astronomical amount of trash. In fact, the average American consumes about 4.4 pounds of trash every single day and America alone sent 254 million tons of trash to the landfill in 2013. Where does it all go? Thankfully, there are certain efforts in place that…Read more & video

via (Video) This Woman Built A House From Milk Boxes — Collective Evolution

The Contraption That Will Clean Up The World’s Oceans Set To Deploy 2018 (Video) — December 29, 2017

Back in 2013, we reported on the story of 19-year-old Boyan Slat, who had developed a device with the capacity to remove 7,250,000 tonnes of plastic and garbage from the world’s oceans in just five years. Originally set to deploy in 2016, the device still had numerous rounds of testing to complete, but testing is finally done,…Read more & short video

via The Contraption That Will Clean Up The World’s Oceans Set To Deploy 2018 — Collective Evolution

Sweden to Incentivize Product Repairs in Effort to Reduce Consumer Waste — Sept. 30, 2016

 

Our world is being totally trashed, not out of necessity, out of convenience. Something has changed in recent decades, and companies deliberately no longer produce goods that will last as long as possible, instead capitalizing on the consumer’s willingness to toss something in the trash and replace it with something new, rather than go through the effort of having it fixed.

It’s called planned obsolescence, a strategy of some product manufacturers. The basic idea is to engineer a product to have a predictably short lifetime so that when it malfunctions or breaks, the company can profit by selling another product. The additional sales and profits make it possible to sell more products at a lower cost, thereby increasing the attractiveness in a replacement. This is especially true for technology products, and some companies are finally beginning to design products that can evolve as technology does.

This business model has led to the collapse of the repair industry which used to be a thriving source of skilled labor for many people while saving resources and reducing mountains of waste.

Sweden is now poised to become the first country in the world to directly address this issue, and has recently proposed tax incentives for repairing and re-using many consumer goods…….

Read more: http://www.wakingtimes.com/2016/09/30/sweden-incentivize-product-repairs-reduce-consumer-waste/